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The artistic residency at the Museum of Gotland will receive Swedish and international artists with a keen interest in heritage, historic cultural environments and historiography to explore, research and visualize heritage anew from an artistic point of view. We would also like to take advantage of the non-profit organisations of Gotland’s great interest in heritage to create an interdisciplinary platform for art and heritage, grounded in the local community.

In this context, artistic research means that the invited artists will use their individual artistic practices, as well as current debates in the field of contemporary art and similar disciplines to explore and contextualize the collections and the historic buildings in the museum collection.

The collections of the Museum of Gotland contain approximately 500 000 objects which give an incredible depth to the project. The artists will be given access to the specialists of the museum, collections and the historic environments connected to these. The artistic research can be made accessible in different ways: through public events, exhibitions or publications depending on the form of the research.

By letting contemporary art meet the regional heritage, the artistic residency will contribute to new and innovative ways of seeing cultural heritage. The encounter between art and heritage means that heritage isn’t just a part of the past but also something that can be used to understand, influence and to interact with our present day.

Duskdust is an artist book and a series of monographs by Susanne Kriemann, which takes as its starting point the former industrial site of limestone mining at Furillen on the north-eastern coast of Gotland, Sweden’s biggest island. It is informed by the artist’s ongoing preoccupation with photography, labour and archaeology. Susanne Kriemann participated in the BAC Site Residency programme in Gotland 2014. She used her time for fieldtrips and research on the history of the lime stone industry and the current cement production on the island. In 2015 she returned to Gotland, to make her final series of photographs for the book publication and the photographic print series duskdust.

The book includes photographs taken during her residencies and site visits, archival material as well as text contributions by invited authors. Writer Kirsty Bell travelled to Gotland to follow the artist’s research trails while media theorist Jussi Parikka situates Kriemann’s artistic approach within current discourse on geology and media. Maria Barnas wrote a poem based on Kriemann’s walk through a tunnel on Furillen. Livia Paldi introduces The Site Residency programme and the specificity of the selected site in relationship to Kriemann’s work.

Ingela Johansson started her work on Andrei’s Maria while she participated in the Research-in Residence program at BAC in 2016. In the artist’s film the Icelandic actress Guðrún Gísladóttir returns to the site of the shooting with her daughter Vera Illugadóttir, thirty years later and talks about the making of the film. It is an interpretation and a tribute to one of the film’s main characters, Maria – the witch, who was destined to save the world from a nuclear disaster. The film reflects on Tarkovsky’s criticism of civilization, dream interpretations, spiritual devotion, while going behind the scenes from Gísladóttir´s unique perspective.

Portable Landscapes is an international art project with exhibitions in Riga, Paris, New York, Gotland and Berlin, which traces the manifestations of Latvian art in exile and emigration from the beginning of the 20th century until today. The project examines the stories of exiled and émigré Latvian artists, locating them within the broader context of 20th-century art history, and wider processes of migration and globalization.

As part of the Portable Landscapes project BAC will host artists, curators and writers that will trace the stories of émigré Latvian artists in Sweden. The collaboration is part of BAC’s AIR_BALTIC residency 2017, with support from Culture Point North. The resulting projects will be presented at the National Museum of Art in Riga in April 2018.

‘Pilgrim’ stems from the Latin peregrinus, which originally meant foreigner, wanderer, exile, and traveller, as well as newcomer and stranger. The participants of Apostlahästar på Gotland will discover the
island beyond the conventional tourist perspective through the temporary role of the pilgrim. By wandering through the cultural heritage and natural environment of Gotland they will explore the past of the island to understand our present and visualize our future.

The artist Henrik Andersson about Repetition:
“The question of the origins of music is as topical in today’s Visby as it was in Greece during antiquity 2500 years ago. Because musical harmony could be explained mathematically it made people think that music was something that followed the laws of physics, rather than originated from within culture. People have often sought to control how, when and where music should be played – as it affects us in ways we cannot control.”

Mats Hermansson, Dean of Visby Cathedral:
“Visby Cathedral, Saint Maria, has been at the centre of Visby since 1225 and has always provided a runway for things international, different and foreign. She was built originally for the German merchants in Visby. As a Church and Cathedral she embraces all of her yearly 300 000 visitors. Everybody’s welcome – regardless of the purpose of the visit. The church has always manifested Everybody’s equal worth. This has been the case from its origins and this is still the case all over the world. The Visby Cathedral has named itself the Love Cathedral of Sweden. All love is of God. This is the heritage of the Church: The God of our lives makes way through all the moral rubble, through to each and everyone of us and says: You are allowed to be who you are – Don’t be afraid! Saint Maria is more related to other holy rooms over the world than to other buildings in Visby. We humans have given these holy rooms beautiful names like: Synagogue, Pagoda, Temple and Mosque.

About BAC
BAC – Baltic Art Center is a residency for contemporary art on Gotland. We are an international meeting place in the Baltic Sea region that brings together artists and organisations, that share our engagement in today’s society, in artistic projects. The restaging of Henrik Andersson’s piece for church bells played in an arabic ton scale, together with Visby Cathedral and Konstfrämjandet (People’s Movements for Art Promotion) is a way for us to reflect on recent years political upheavals and to create a dialogue about the role of culture in public space.

About Konstfrämjandet – People’s Movements for Art Promotion:

The People’s Movements for Art Promotion collaborates with its member associations and other art promoters so that art can be present in all parts of society. Artistic thinking is our common ability for innovation and we see art as a way of thinking ABOUT the world. Henrik Andersson’s piece originates from our musical history and shows us how humanity thinks and develops.

In May 2016, 12 young people from Gotland and the Baltic States participated in an art project that followed the tens of thousands of people who fled the Baltic during the Second World War. Follow the participant’s experiences and thoughts about migration in Sandra Fröberg’s documentation of the project.

Also, meet Helmi Warg, whose father Hans Suur rowed from Saaremaa to Fårö Ascension Day in 1944. Suur then went back and retrieved Helmi 9 years old and the rest of the family. When Helmi returns to Gotland many years later, she finds her father’s boat at Kovik’s fishing museum.

Sam Smith is a video installation and performance artist born in Sydney, Australia, currently living and working in London, UK. By treating built forms as active things, Smith gives resonance to the histories within their material structures. The locations of past films and 20th century Modernist residences become vibrant entities, capable of reorganising matter, facilitating life and playing a crucial part in their own narrative.

 

Introduced by Lívia Páldi and with a contribution by the residency’s conceptualizer, Sebastian Cichocki, this publication presents various visual and textual materials of the residency’s three participating artists, Annika Eriksson, Susanne Kriemann, and Agnieszka Polska, including the “results” of their invited ghostwriters who translated the experience of the artists and curators into literary fiction. TSR was an opportunity for various artistic and curatorial processes, fantasies, and trajectories to intersect in unique and significant ways. The design of the book, by Krzysztof Pyda, allows for the thought fragments, notes, stories, and poetic observations of the participants to intertwine, bringing the reader into the free-floating conversation that has been basis of the residency.

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Photo: Carl Johan Erikson

A defining feature of the current society is how we spend our vacations. Travelling has become a popular practice for escaping the environment of everyday life. Scholars have interpreted this temporary respite as a metaphorical pilgrimage. Under this analogy, the tourist becomes a ‘secular pilgrim’ searching for a non-quotidian experience and a punctuation mark in his/her biography. This recreational demand is echoed by the tourism industry that includes in its holiday packages sacred routes -like Camino de Santiago in Spain and S: t Olavsleden in Sweden-Norway- and secular modern pilgrimages -like Elvis Presley’s grave at Graceland.

The publication features more than fifteen artists and writers who engage with a variety of comedic techniques, often as a way to subvert the strategies and themes of stand-up comedy and rethink artistic performativity and audience participation. Public speech and the ways of addressing sensitive issues, stereotypes, taboos, and power relations are also examined, not only to seek new modes of public address, but to look critically at the art world and cultural-political operations, conservatism, and inflexibility.

Opening reception of the mural painting “Time capsule” made by students from the Vilnius Fine Arts Academy in Lithuania and part of the BAC youth project: In the Trails of the Boat Refugees.
Part of the opening will be a performance: “We have sung with tears”, which is inspired by a concert with the same name given by Estonian refugees to Gotland in 1944.

Following the performance is a film screening of the documentary film produced by the project.

Between 2013 and 2016, Sharon Lockhart created a body of work revolving around conditions of childhood, a thematic that has appeared throughout her practice since the early 1990s. Inspired in part by the life and work of Polish-Jewish pedagogue Janus Korczak — whose radical philosophies were among the first to empower the often-disregarded voice of the child — Lockhart conducted extensive research into various analyses and representations of children. At the heart of her research was her collaboration and friendship with a young Polish woman named Milena, whom she first befriended in 2009 during the production of her film Podwórka in Łódź, Poland. Lockhart’s longterm work with Milena, who has lived in various state residences, has mapped the trajectory of a small girl’s maturation into an adolescent and young adult, serving as a site of mutual discovery and revelation. Their collaboration has been the subject of a dedicated exhibition that traveled from the Center of Contemporary Art, Warsaw, to Bonniers, Konsthall, Stockholm and Kunstmuseum Luzern (2013 – 2015), as well as a solo exhibition at The Arts Club of Chicago (2016).

As Lockhart’s collaboration with Milena evolved, it grew to include Milena’s peers at The Youth Centre for Sociotherapy, a state residence for girls in Rudzienko, Poland. The tour-de-force of Lockhart’s work in Poland, the film Rudzienko grew out of a series of workshops the artist devised for the young women over the course of two consecutive summers. Bringing in specialists to develop targeted exercises, Lockhart sought to empower the girls’ individual voices and explore the specific choices they make in articulating their perspectives about the world. In the film, framed by the surrounding landscape, the young women’s philosophical conversations and actions address topics of children’s agency and subjectivity, underscoring Lockhart’s aim to foster self-reflection, expression and, above all, for the voice of the child to be heard.

Writer Kirsty Bell travelled to Gotland to follow the artist’s research trails while media theorist Jussi Parikka situates Kriemann’s artistic approach within current discourse on geology and media. Maria Barnas wrote a poem based on Kriemann’s walk through a tunnel at the industrial site. Lívia Páldi, former director of BAC, gives an introduction to The Site Residency program and the specificities of selected sites in relationship to Kriemann’s work.

THERE ARE THREE RULES IN THE CLUB:
1. NO PHOTOS OF THE PERFORMANCE
2. NO BODY-SHAMING
3. RESPECT DADDY

LINE UP
♦ 9-12 Suicide One (Ladies In Da Game – PL)
♦ 12-01 The Sweetest Thing (ES/SE/VEN)
♦ 01-02 Dgeral (VEN/ES)

ENTRANCE
♦ POWER HOUR: 9 PM-11 PM: One piece of queer literature OR 150 SEK.*
♦ AFTER 11 PM: 150 SEK.

*Intersectional queer and feminist literature, examples include printed articles, digital articles, books, magazines, self-published zines will be accepted. Selected material will be added to the IMA READ library for intersectional, queer feminist literature.

During their BAC residency, they work on the initial stages of a self-authored book, preliminarily titled: The ABC’s of Racial Privilege and Prejudice in Northern Norway.

With the intention of getting critical feedback and meaningful discussions on the ABC’s project IMA READ invited the Gotland community to 2 public events:
A Feminist Artist Brunch (FAB), with presentations of IMA READ and the ABC’s project.
More images.

POWER▼MAKT – a one-night-only queer performance club. Entrance to the club will be a piece of intersectional feminist literature (i.e. book, zine, etc.) for the IMA READ library, which will be housed in Tromsø.
Read more.

Ingela Johansson’s  artistic practice often responds to site-specific issues, using an interdisciplinary approach and combines various aesthetic strategies to create an engaging body of work. She questions the artist’s role as a catalyst and facilitator. Her aim is to expose and challenge the political, ethical, or social systems and the history writing about them, all of which control our everyday lives. Several of her works address the institution and the museum as a place for the public, as public space, and as an organization. Her work often starts with archive research and continues into presentations in a variety of media including video, photo, text and installation. As part of her practice, she has regularly collaborated with other artists and experts and has organized discussions.

On Gotland, the group met some current asylum seekers and heard their story. A film crew followed the participants’ thoughts and experience and the result of the project is a film documentation. The project has also had several public presentations, including art exhibitions and film screenings in all the participating countries.

The aim of the project was not intended to only commemorate the past, but also to promote a deeper understanding of the current refugee situation. Not long ago was the Baltic Sea divided by the EU border, and the project also aimed at creating more co-operation within the Baltic Sea Region.

 

Part of the exhibition “Stories of Migration – then and now” at the Museum of Occupations in Estonia. Photo courtesy the Holmert Archive.

 

View the trailer from the film that documented the project:

 

EVERYBODY READS THE NEWS!
Children, aliens, their hosts,
bots and speech recognition software,
Siri, significant others,
and others

EVERYBODY READS!

You start. Erratic
comets commenting verbatim.
All languages, including
forgotten, made up,
and the machine ones.
Random destinations,
side effects, pluralist trips.

EVERYBODY READS THE NEWS!

“A dressed male” vs. “addressed mail.”
A mouth is better than a pen.
An ear is worse than lips.
Italic is better than a bold underlining.
Better is worse. Naturally,

EVERYBODY READS!

The news and information in general flouts in the manner similar to the plankton. Do you know what the paradox of the plankton is? In aquatic biology, the paradox of the plankton describes the situation in which a limited range of resources supports an unexpectedly wide range of plankton species, apparently flouting the competitive exclusion principle, which holds that when two species compete for the same resource, one will be driven to extinction.
Similarly, please, join us for this reading night driven by various vectors of enjoyments, interests, and voices.

Theory of Plankton

“Do you know what the paradox of the plankton is? In aquatic biology, the paradox of the plankton describes the situation in which a limited range of resources supports an unexpectedly wide range of plankton species, apparently flouting the competitive exclusion principle, which holds that when two species compete for the same resource, one will be driven to extinction.
Similarly, our project is driven not by a single concept but by various interests, some of them also coming from the Baltic-Scandinavian region.”

Read more (pdf)

Background
future_island was three expert meetings and seminars organized by BAC with the aim to further support its ongoing exchange of methods of contemporary cultural production within and beyond Gotland. Each seminar addressed various notions such as: publicness; multidisciplinary working; context- and site-specificity; approaches to artistic and moving image research and experimentation in time-based forms. Exploration into these topics supported the development and launch of a new pilot, Towards Slite International (TSI).

Towards Slite International
TSI would investigate further how site-specific situations: post-industrial developments, landscaping combined with permanently or temporarily sited interventions, sculptural/architectural elements, participatory projects can encourage conversations around urgent environmental, political and social dilemmas including regeneration, migration and cultural integration. Embedded in Slite, its close vicinity  and Northern Gotland TSI aims at interacting directly with both the various localities –their histories, topographies and considers inhabiting, if even temporarily, places and sites that are not primarily known for their art scenes and are outside the usual art hubs.
In cooperation with individuals, locally based industry, entrepreneurs, and regionally-based (self-)organizations the project´s main objective is to create the necessary basis for working with artists on long-term context-sensitive projects that support community development and successful youth and audience engagement in local contexts.

The primary material for TSI – as much as it was for the first phase of future_island – consists of the island itself both as a heritage site, network of human and non-human resources, and as a site of research and production, as well as a potential testfield.

Seminar
TSI started with a week-long residency, site-visits and public evening seminar in December 2015 in order to develop the framework for a long-term engagement and production of both temporary and more permanent work on Gotland. Participants included art historian Cecilia Gelin, and artists Ingela Johansson and Åsa Sonjasdotter who together with Anna Norberg and Livia Paldi (BAC) discussed models and practices of collaboration, dialogue and hosting.
The residency drew attention on small museums and memorials and the role and strategies of mostly voluntarily run local organizations who safeguard particular cultural heritage.

Artists: Timo Menke and Susanne Skog (SWE) from r a k e t a
Nadya Gorokhova and Ilya Grishaev (RUS)
Curators: Maria Kotlyachkova (RUS) and r a k e t a (SWE)

Radioarctica examines the common history of the populations in the area as well as their shared geographical frame of reference by presenting an alternative mapping of opinions and experiences that go beyond the politically motivated identity formation efforts and their paradoxes.

Zhanna Guzenko and Oleg Khadartcev (Fridaymilk) will stay at BAC between October 12 and 25, 2015. During their residency they aim at conceptualizing the structure of an online radio station that is to give voice to the region’s ethnically diverse and multi-lingual communities and stimulate them to share their opinions and experiences, thus providing a unique media voice for the Barents Region.

Radioarctica is also considered as a long-term visual almanac project composed of one-minute length video portraits, a collection of several unrelated pieces that bring together various stories, experiences and attitudes to the region and of the peoples inhabiting it. The project is imagined as a constantly expanding web-based platform with video extracts that engage in dialogue on an ever-increasing range of political, social, cultural and ecological issues and provide contemplation on the challenges the region has been facing and motivation to address the considerable outflow of population from the North.

PROGRAM
October 24

12:00-12:50 Preview of Vertigo Sea

13.00-13.10 Welcome by Katarina Pierre, Director Bildmuseet

13.10-14.10 Another history is always possible
Artist John Akomfrah in conversation with Livia Paldi, Director BAC–Baltic Art Center

14.10-14.40 Coffee

14.40 -15.20 Do it yourself or in collaboration?
Artist John Akomfrah, Lina Gopaul and David Lawson from Smoking Dogs Films about the collaborative aspects of their work.
Moderator: Katarina Pierre, Bildmuseet

15.20-17.00 Screenings: Handsworth Songs (1986) and The Stuart Hall Project (2013).

October 25

14:00 Welcome från director Katarina Pierre

14:10 John Akomfrah makes a presentation of Vertigo Sea

14:30 Swedish premiere of Vertigo Sea (48 min), which will be screened continuously during Bildmuseet’s opening hours

 

In collaboration with BAC–Baltic Art Center, the Umeå Academy of Fine Arts and Humlab-X, Umeå University.

Information must always cross a threshold before it can be communicated to consciousness. A medium is required, something to ensure that the information can reach the other side and that, once it has arrived, it can be understood the way it was intended. A camera can of course act as that medium and represent information visually, and language itself, the very words we must use to render our thoughts comprehensible, is also a means with which to cross the threshold.

The information we receive then piles upon itself like the strata of rock formations, which show their history simultaneously, the past and present merging into a giant structure.

The condition of (artistic) labor is one to which I am always seem to return to when I consider a new work. My preoccupation with uncovering or rereading previously sculpted histories, forever shuffle through and digging into archives, has fueled my fascination with archaeology and the anthropological unearthing of lost narratives. More recently, my interest in labor as not only a necessary component of creating art, but also as the amount of physical energy that humans have, throughout history, applied to nature in order to exploit its materials, has led me to seek out areas where hard physical labor and the process of revelation converge, namely, in mining.

The work duskdust (to be completed as book work in early 2016 and as a photographic work later next spring) deals with a former cement factory turned into an Eco-friendly boutique hotel. One of the remaining mountains of cement rubble becomes the protagonist of the work. The sun renders the mountain’s resolution and colors for my high resolution camera, to become digital noise in some parts. In the work, another sun emerges, which is the lava in the oven heating up the rocks in order to crash to dust and to become cement. This act of light is controlled 24/7 by the workers in the factory. The mountain reflects both suns and questions the capacity of the eye to see, erasing material, calculation sight.
The work challenges the medium in which digital photographs enter spatial dimensions. It renders the act of crashing mountain into dust into a light absorbing material.
Susanne Kriemann, September 2015

The notion of melancholia covers a vast semantic territory from art history to global politics to most intimate and idiosyncratic psycho-geographies. It tends to be more vibrant in times of transition, even if only imagined, and it is far from coincidence that last decades witnessed „Rings of Saturn” by W.G. Sebald, „Melancholy: Genius and Madness in Art” exhibition in Neue Nationalgalerie or world awards winning „Melancholia” by Lars von Trier. The visual and conceptual realms of melancholia are well rooted in our collective representations. Yet until now, it has never been a subject of a thorough audio-analysis. “Tyto Alba” is a unique inquiry into sounds of melancholia. More than that, it shows that it is an inevitably aural phenomena, which only through sound can reveal some of its features.

“Tyto Alba” has been conceived as a theoretical research and a recording studio experiment which resulted in a sound essay published by a leading contemporary music label, Bôłt Records. Blurring the edges between sound genres, it is a horspiel and a reading; a piece of electroacoustic music as well as plunderphonics; an attempt at sound portraits or simply a collection of songs. All in all, it remains a sonic take on melancholia. But forget weepy piano music and sad boys’ songs. The sound of melancholia is extreme and obsessive. It is painful and pleasureable. Apathy and self-dismissal come not from weary music but from sonic hallucinations, acousmatic sounds and alien voices arriving at a special mode of hearing. In one of the footnotes of „Stanzas”, Giorgio Agamben points out that the well known melancholic posture of a man leaning his head against the hand is actually an attempt to get away from suffering of his ringing ear. This observation is the main coordinate of the piece’s development. It departs from melancholic listening which turns women into birds and was portrayed in the opening chapter of W.G. Sebald’s „Rings of Saturn”. From there on, the leading voice of the performance imperceptibly meanders between reading, commenting, quoting and misleading the tale – an interpretation of the Sebald’s initial intuitions. Narration wriggles from Auguste Rodin to Bedřich Smetana, from Georges Perec to Alvin Lucier. Their music and words are accompanied by hundreds of found footage samples bringing together laryngological patients, paranormal voices, death rattles, monaural beats, tinnitus sounds but most of all birds, in particular barn owls. They are all mirrored by saxophone playing by the one and only – Martin Küchen.

Live performance of “Tyto Alba” heads for an overwhelming and immersive seance in which all the aforementioned sounds merge and collide to form an audio phantasy of melancholic listening, a room-full of sound in which a listener loses a sense of space – designed by one more one and only sound engineer in Europe, Ralf Meinz.

For the last 30 years and spanning cinema, television, and gallery-based installations, John Akomfrah’s work has engaged with questions of memory and identity, creating moving-image works which give a voice to the legacy of the African Diaspora in Europe. He fills the voids in history using archival material to create film essays and speculative fictional stories about our collective past. His innovative works, expanding the boundaries of the documentary form and the format of the film essay. In his poetic and polyphonic films, Akomfrah creates sensual audio-visual experiences while simultaneously exploring a filmic language that may comprehend the trauma and sense of alienation of displaced subjects.

The lecture and screening of Liza Babenko’s short videos; Maidan: Lost Revolution, (2014), and Banderovite (2013) will focus the post-colonial, social and visual analysis of the Ukrainian Maidan revolution, from an internal perspective. Position of the Ukrainian “Other”, which historically belonged to the Crimea and Donbass, will be problematized as an post-colonial evidence of a country broken into several national identities. Based on the researches of the Ukrainian political and historical situation, Babenko discusses the necessity of actualization in nowadays “post-Maidan” Ukraine such analytical categories as nationalism, patriotism, national identity politics and politics of memory concerning the Second World War. Besides, taking into consideration the activation of the new oligarchic elites in Ukraine following the Maidan events, Babenko proposes to go out of the both mainstream and populist propagandas (Russian imperialistic and Ukrainian nationalist-patriotic agendas) and try to find a more socially oriented and united all Ukrainian regions form of the possible revolution.

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Sergei Loznitsa: MAIDAN, HD, color, 130 min

MAIDAN chronicles the civil uprising that took place in Kiev (Ukraine) in the winter of 2013/14. The film follows the progress of the revolution: from peaceful rallies, half a millionstrong, in the Maidan square, to the bloody street battles between the protestors and riot police. MAIDAN is a portrait of an awakening nation, rediscovering its identity. Director Sergei Loznitsa rises above current political issues and looks at the nature of the popular uprising as a social, cultural and philosophical phenomenon. A powerful mix of enthusiasm, heroic struggle, terror, courage, aspiration, people’s solidarity, folk culture, passion and self-sacrifice, MAIDAN is a stunning cinematic canvas combining classical film making style and documentary urgency.

Drawing on, and abstracting, the framework of the residency, Eriksson’s approach and method enquires into the possibility for a site to provide the script, and remit. For the city itself to serve as the ghostwriter of choice.

Something is here nothing is here (horror) takes the form of a light box placed in a pedestrian tunnel in the city center. The light of the sign is slowly fading in and out. Something is here nothing is here (horror) manifests and insists on its own impossibility, as a continuously present and breathing presence. This slightly disturbing figure, has no obvious sender; it is not a commercial, nor an official message. The piece is left behind, permanent yet following, and subjected to the conditions of its site.

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Participating artists: Carlos Amorales (MX), Heidrun Holzfeind (A), Sven Johne (DE), Meiro Koizumi (JP), Susanne Kriemann (DE), Zbigniew Libera (PL), Maha Maamoun (EG), Roee Rosen (IL), Clemens von Wedemeyer (DE).
Curators: Edit Molnar and Livia Paldi

The exhibition is on view between April 24 and May 31, 2015 at Galeria Centralis / Open Society Archives, Budapest and between April 16 and May 7, 2015 at Platan Gallery / Polish Institute Budapest.

The one day seminar is divided into 3 segments
Morning field trip to the bottom of the quarry and a visit to the Cementa tower with a magnificent view of the surroundings for a Micro/macro view of Slite.

Afternoon seminar
Petra Gråberg, Swedish Institute, programme manager, Baltic Sea Unit, Department for International Relations.
Rainer Hauswirth, Director Goethe-Institute Sweden
Nivå landskapsarchitects, Vasaplan Umeå project presentation
Ingo Vetter, visual artist working with sculpture, photography and installations.

Evening program at Slite theatre for the local community in Swedish:
Introduction by Slite community architect
BAC short films by: Jeremy Deller, Sacrilege, 2012
Katie Paterson, Future Library, 2014
Michael Sailstorfer, Folkestone Digs, 2014
Lisa Näslund, landscape architect
Panel discussion where local community members, municipality clerks and Cementa will present their future visions for Slite. The audience will be invited to leave comments or ask questions.

Local school children have been working with Gotland Museum art educator with visions for the future quarry on exhibit in the theatre.

How to tell the story of a very old place of confinement and punishment? What happens if all the pictures are wrong or missing and the people long gone? What traces and messages might they have left for us to find? After such terrible treatment, it is possible now to offer those confined in the prison a more hospitable welcome? This is the hope.

THE WORKHOUSE (BREITENAU ROOM) is a collaboration between artist Ines Schaber and writer Avery F. Gordon produced for dOCUMENTA (13), which engages with the history of the former monastery, workhouse, concentration camp, Gestapo camp, and girls’ reformatory. Over time, Breitenau has confined many persons considered extraneous and disposable, subjecting them to a regime of punishment and correction.

Consisting of photographs, curtain, text, and audio files, THE WORKHOUSE (BREITENAU ROOM) presents glimpses of fugitive knowledge that emerges in and around Breitenau. This knowledge carries a feeling for justice and embodies a principle – “what exists cannot be true“- that brings to life what Ernst Bloch called the “not-yet“, thereby conjuring historical alternatives that could have been taken but were not.
(excerpt from the cover)

Text: Avery F. Gordon, Ines Schaber
Photography: Ines Schaber
Translation into German: Stefan Pente, Ines Schaber, Nikolai Franke
Translation into English: William Wheeler
Editor: Ines Schaber
Design: form und sinn
Litography and Print: DZA – Druckerei zu Altenburg, Altenburg
Published by Verlag der Buchhandlung Walter König, Köln, 2014

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Photo: Ines Schaber / Avery F. Gordon: The Workhouse (Breitenau Room) (2012). Installation (photographs, curtain, text, audio). Courtesy the authors and dOCUMENTA (13)

The Workhouse is the name for a series of activities and projects called rooms organized by Avery Gordon and Ines Schaber. Overall, The Workhouse’s activities are broadly concerned with the cultivation of ways of living and working independently/autonomously of, or outside of, or in opposition to, or as an alternative to, or alongside of but not entirely inside of the dominant terms of social order. The traditional workhouses, first developed in the late 16th century and reaching their peak in the 19th century, were prisons where people, mostly poor, who refused to work or stay put or behave like “good” workers and obedient social subjects were confined, punished, and corrected. By contrast, the Schaber/Gordon Workhouse activities are designed to provide a hospitable space for the critical and imaginative thinking/practices of “bad” workers, idlers, strikers, collaborators, runaways, and other individuals who do not want and need conventional “correction” and “re-education.”
The Workhouse is a member of The Hawthorne Archive and some of its materials are held there.

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Photo: Courtesy the authors and dOCUMENTA (13)

Sometimes when you plan things, really plan, they don’t go the way you imagine. After discussions at BAC–Baltic Art Center, the Måfå Research Group decided that too much planning would exclude space for things to evolve in this outdoors event. Instead, we shifted our attention to create something which allowed for the random, for the unexpected, for a co-created space; a space which let in air and light with openings for people to invite themselves.

Dialogue is, of course, something that doesn’t just take place in outer talk between people. Here it involved people wondering in their inner dialogue, being in relation to an old space in a new way, using the medium of their phone camera to take pictures of something they came across to show others. This is all dialogue. And inclusivity. But there was outer talk too.
“What’s in the bags?” we were asked. “What would you put in the bags?” we asked back. Love, hope, tenderness, care, people answered.
“Hey!” said one young man, “I was just coming over to challenge you! I thought you wanted money from people. And then I saw, you were just drawing people in. This is beautiful!”

When we looked around at the blank white paper bags with candles burning in them we thought, yes, we were right not to put words on the bags. Bags, in this world, almost always have words on them. We live in a highly worded world, where words are synonymous with influence, usually with a socio-economic agenda. Instead, visitors made their own meanings, and chatted. The young men who had been doing acrobatics on the concrete and grass came and helped us lay out the installation and then continued to run through them in their build up to great leaps of faith. One of the young men recognized his teacher who came to see the installation. He hugged her with warmth and respect. Another young man hung around, despite us not having cigarettes to offer him. It was enough to talk and be involved.

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After deconstructing the installation and reconstructing it along the sea wall, we allowed it to go into its further incarnation, flames to the sea’s edge. Like we too continue to change and take on different forms on the edges of chance meetings.

 

For further information please contact:
Dennis Josefson, founder of the program
activistinresidence@gmail.com

Gotlands Regnbågsgrupp
gotlandsregnbagsgrupp@hotmail.com

Through an unsettling arrangement of sound, voice and moving images derived from on location interviews and footage as well as archival material, the single-channel video installation invites audiences to explore Chinese and Aboriginal (indigenous Taiwanese) philosophies and practices of healing as well as the dominant (’official’) Euro- American mental health paradigm, and to relate these to the larger social and historical framework of Taiwan’s development as a modern and post- colonial state. RTS relays fragmented blocs of sensation, sense-knowledge, in uneasy relations to each other. In so doing, it mirrors or relays fault-lines in Taiwan as a nation-assemblage, at the same time provoking the imagination of possibilities for new and more life affirming subjectivities, not only in Taiwan, where it was shot, but also wherever Rupini and Tan exhibit the work and extend it through conversations with different audiences and cultures.

PUBLIC WALKS
In addition to the installation, Rupini and Tan have developed the public walks workshop as a means of exploring connections between different local histories, spaces and actors, in relation to the broad research themes of RTS. The first edition was introduced in Manila (Philippines) in 2013. The second edition is planned for Malmö in 2014. Given that the walks in Malmö will take place directly after the Swedish General Election, Rupini and Tan intend to explore issues of ’race,’ (a concept which, apparently, should be removed from Swedish legislation) discrimination and power in Sweden, and to relate these issues to Sweden’s international relations. Participants will be identified from the Skåne region, for example, a representative of the Arbetarröreslens Arkiv i Skåne (The Labour Movement’s Archives and Library), and invited to participate in the run up to the event.

Rupini and Tan are particularly interested in local views on current socio- political issues, for example, immigration and the rise of Sverige Demokraterna (the Sweden Democrats). The public walks effectively map the outlines of Sweden as a transnational assemblage, made up of global flows of people and capital, and changing relations between ’East’ and ’West’ as these change with the movements of colonisation and decolonisation. Participants are given the option of being recorded or not during the conversations.

Asger Jorn founded SISV together with a scholarly group in 1962, following his break with the Situationist movement. SISV was intended to operate both as a publishing house and as a research centre bringing together different disciplines ranging from archaeology, art and cultural history to the visual arts in order to revisit the legacy of pre-Christian Scandinavia, within the European context. Jorn was working towards what he called “’10,000 years of Nordic Folk Art” (10 000 års nordisk folkekunst), a series of 32 books with photographs of historical artifacts based on his research and documentation.

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Photo: Gérard Franceschi 1964. © Donation Jorn, Silkeborg

The seminar is aimed at inventorying the archives while at the same time questioning the accumulated material, its history, and its past and current status and context, as well as the aesthetic and political implications of Jorn’s encyclopaedic comparative method – his work as an artist-historian operating in the field of scientific historical research, with the research itself as his artistic material.
Together with Jacqueline de Jong, who accompanied Jorn on Gotland in 1964 August, the seminar also revisits different locations and sites that had been photographed by Gerard Franceschi and Ulrik Ross for the Institute.

The Scandinavian Mutant Summer Camp seminar is co-organized by BAC and Henrik Andersson accompanying his exhibition “Scandinavian Vandalism” at Gotlands Konstmuseum with the kind support of Konstnärsnämden.

Today the majority of  ideas brought forward in the arts of any kind, have likely been conceived in the English language by a person with a mother tongue other than English.

For every native speaker of the English language, there are 4 non-native speakers. As the world’s primary lingua franca, English is now a language of non-standards whose syntax, vocabularies and pronunciation vary across the globe. Strangely, this language does not itself have a name or status; its use is considered something of a natural fact; and its artistic potential is largely ignored.

There are several causes and effects of the prominence of English, many of which can be judged undesirable. But when English speakers world-wide would rid themselves from a single native-speaking standard and from proficiency qualification; when they would co-opt the language that they may or may not feel has been imposed on them, the possibilities for emancipatory and creative use are abundant. The aesthetic problems of using English as a simplified relay language between different tongues may dissolve. The suffocating influence of professional jargon may disappear. Utopian, often universalistic, language projects of the past may be renewed.

Dutch artist Nicoline van Harskamp has been working on an ongoing project and a film on this topic, that includes a number of language experiments around Europe.

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Photo © BAC

For the experiment on Gotland, 4 artists from Serbia, Korea, Cuba and Tehran come together in a house in Hangvar. The house represents a ‘place without language’, i.e. some kind of  linguistic neutrality. Katarina Popovic, Jinjoo Kim, Susana Matienzo and Setareh Fatehi, each speak a very different version of English that they have learned and developed in their respective countries. In the course of 3 days, they will bring each others’ Englishes closest possible to one common point. Not in terms of what is most intelligible (there are studies and theories around that already that usually involve simplification) but in terms of an ambition or desire they might have for the future use of a “common” language, especially in relation to the arts.

Finally, the participants and Nicoline van Harskamp will create a small scene that is scripted in the desired English(es), that will be staged in one of the beautiful settings that Gotland offers. Together with extensive recordings from the working-process, this scene will be included as a video work in the overall project “Englishes”.

An earlier piece was commissioned by BMW Tate Live: Performance Room in 2013. You can view it online.

BAC: collaborative strategies and critical engagement
with
Marcus Lindeen, filmmaker and writer based in Stockholm
Ewa Einhorn and Jeuno JE Kim, artists based in Berlin and Seoul /MalmöFilm on Gotland: Reinventing Cinema – in search of future film art
with
Paola Ciliberto, film commissioner at Film on Gotland, initiator of the project Gotland Film Lab in Kustateljén, Fårösund, that aims at developing a platform for artistic film production
Anna Eborn, filmmaker based in Stockholm
Hjalmar Palmgren, director of the Production Funding & Promotion Department, Swedish Film Institute, Stockholm

Valand Academy: Camera as a tool
with
Klara Björk, producer and head of Department of Film Studies at Valand Academy–University of Gothenburg
Linda Sternö, filmmaker and producer, lecturer at Film Curating MA program at the Valand Academy–University of Gothenburg
Cecilia Torquato, film director, producer and the research representative for the Department of Film Studies at Valand Academy–University of Gothenburg
Patrik Eriksson, PhD fellow at the Department of Film Studies at Valand Academy–University of Gothenburg

In her film, Polska describes the future as a space deprived of any attributes other than memory. The mutual influences of the past and the forthcoming events are staged in at once ludicrous and melancholic situation of the ‘heaven for the artists’, where the artists from different generations meet after death. The encounter in the symbolic, phantasmal landscape is followed by the discussions exploring the notion of human desire for methaphysics and the urge toward the sublime and knowledge.

 

“The Tape Never Lies” is an autonomous act of the institutional opera “Spoken Exhibitions” prepared by Sebastian Cichocki, Michał Libera, Jarosław Trybuś and Grzegorz Piątek. The audio drama in three acts draws its inspiration from non-mainstream projects, familiar only to a handful of specialists, in art, music and architecture – projects never carried out or missing documentation. Spoken Exhibitions are a textual collage divided into roles, composed of both existing and imaginary notes, manifestoes and postulates of artists.

The Tape Never Lies is a mockumentary bringing together three infamous thieves of sound. Kicking off from a never displayed and never photocopied score of Krzysztof Pendercki’s “Psalmus”, diving into the history of inventing a stethoscope and ending up with a recording of a recording of a piece of anecdotal music. All referring to visions of Edgar Varese. A reading session accompanied by a soundtrack consisting of music by Krzysztof Penderecki, John Tilbury, Rinus van Alebeek and many others.

Good artists borrow. Great artists steal
Pablo Picasso. Or Igor Stravinsky

The greatest swindles in music business come not from the sheer appropriation of the material. This is minor money and quick trials. The big money is in the thefts of mean, deceitful and most of all public character. It is in re-appropriation turned against the author, in a public perversion of his or her image. It is in Michael Jackson having “Bad” hiccup or Dolly Parton pretending to be male in “Pretender”.

Over the last decades with the development of P2P and YouTube stealing became an innocent and barely visible everyday practice. So the question is not whether to steal or not. The question is why deliberately make it public? The talk will about the specifics of thefts in the aural domain, the ownership and the loss of sonic identity, and finally stealing sounds and music in order to develop a critical response on culture and art.

The research Radul has proposed at BAC has a number of stages. She is not turning questions of the residency into the “content”, however the plan is to admit into the working process, all the complexities of the encounter.  That is, the work incorporates its own startled response to the diversity and unfamiliarity of both the residency possibilities/expectations, and the Gotland experience.

It begins with developing a method. Not a method solely by which to produce an artwork, but a method which is an artwork. What is needed is kind of system for research, collecting, collaborating, recording, editing, displaying. The method is one that continuously turns the corner on itself. It begins with a re-conception of fieldwork.

Canadian artist Charles Stankievech makes a distinction between the method of field work, and “a fieldwork”, that is a work which is “dynamic and geospatial.” The method will configure the encounter between a range of artists, thinkers, visitors and locals who will be brought in as a team that is diverse and shifting. The models for such teamwork are ethnological or forensic fieldwork, script writing, collage, new music and movement improvisation.

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Photocredit: Judy Radul 2013 © BAC

Judy Radul says:  “we will consider the specifics of Gotland including militarization, limestone mining, nature and leisure and how these categories come into play. We will also tune ourselves to “nothing” to the tangible artificiality of our own presence, to the empty spaces as much as the obvious “topics”. One of the responsibilities of art is to produce a response where none has been called for, to visit without invitation, to alter the relation between subject and object, that is the paradigms for thought and social relations.”

Invited experts are Anne Lang from Region Halland, who is presenting In Site, an EU-based joint art project with the internationally acclaimed artist Susan Philipsz. Magdalena Malm, direktor of the Public Art Agency Sweden, and the Belgian artist Els Dietvorst showing her Irish film project: The Black Lamb. The Hungarian artist Tamás Kaszás and Gotland based cultural studies scientist Lena Nygårds, will host a workshop with glimpses of a future Gotland ecology.

Co-hosted by BAC, Gotland Museum of Art, and the Gotland Gallery Association (Gocart Gallery). With support from Region Gotland, Region Halland, Public Art Agency Sweden.

Currently Susanne Kriemann is an advising researcher at the Jan Van Eyck Academy in Maastricht, the Netherlands, where she is continuing her exploration of the power of archives. She incorporates her own photographs with those she has extracted from the vaults of the past, creating works that are not only visually associative but also contextually related, so that a many-layered narrative begins to appear when viewing her projects. Her complex series of photographs are often also published as artist books, with ‘One Day’ published in 2010 by Witte de With, Rotterdam, ‘Ashes and broken brickwork of a logical theory’ in 2010 by ROMA, Amsterdam, ‘One Time One Million’ in 2009 by ROMA, Amsterdam, and ‘12 650’ in 2008 by A Prior, Ghent.

Additionally, she has brought out works that appear exclusively in print form, such as ‘The Future – Ramses Files’ published in 2006 as a newspaper, her 2012 project ‘Het Licht/The Light’ also in newspaper format, and ‘Reading Susanne Kriemann’, a textbook comprised of essays on her work and how it relates to the acts of reading and perceiving. These artist books are testaments to her overarching concern with historiography—how history is written, read, and rewritten—and the connections that can be found between art, literature, and archaeology. Currently she is working on a new artist book, which bears the Latin palindrome as title, ‘in girum imus nocte et consumimur igni’ to be published in spring 2014.

During his stay he worked on the text, a selection of sound recordings, as well as making some new recordings. It became an audio essay about the unbearable listening – a work-in -progress that will result in a recording and a performance. The piece is inspired by Giorgio Agamben’s associations between melancholy and listening, and by Javier Maria’s world of auditory vulnerability. It is an exploration of the subject, misconceptions and scams related to the act of listening. It consists of libretto, audio found footage, field recordings and music all brought together to construct a sonic argumentation in a crime story on the joys of being deaf.

The panel is organized by Olav Westphalen, artist and Lars-Erik Hjertström Lappalainen, philosopher and  writer, and BAC. It is produced in the framework of Context in Flux – Methodological tools for cultural institutions with the support of The Swedish Exhibition Agency.

BAC, Nida Art Colony and Art Lab Gnesta are small art institutions located in a geographical periphery. Each institution has their specific profile, but they all run residency programs with a range of activities, which span from exhibitions, seminars and education. At the same time it is evident for these smaller institutions that the conditions are in a continuous change. Target groups are changing, funding is under constant negotiation, new networks develop over geographical and interdisciplinary areas.

Context in Flux mainly consists of workshops where the participants investigate:
– Relationships between place and practice.
– The interaction between the local situation and the flow of practices and people.
– The residency program as a productive arena and sheltered laboratory.

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Photo: Ulrika Trygg-Wiberg

The symposiums are accessible online through interviews, materials selected from the archives of the participating institutions and individuals; PDF.

Symposium 1
Nida Art Colony, Nida, Lithuania
October 12-13, 2013

Symposium 2
The Swedish Exhibition Agency and BAC, Visby, Sweden
November 22-23, 2013

The Mobile Archive is a project initiated in March 2007 and developed by Eyal Danon and Galit Eilat as a sister project to the Israeli Center for Digital Art’s Video Archive with Eva Birkenstock from the Kunstverein, Hamburg. It comprises over 2000 video and multimedia works from the Center with a strong focus on issues of identity and body politics, nationalism, and militarism, and include artists such as Oreet Ashery, Yael Bartana, Guy Ben-Ner, Michael Blum, Candice Breitz, Amit Goren, Dor Guez, Mark Lewis, Avi Mograbi, Yoshua Okon, Roee Rosen, Ruti Sela and Artur Zmijewski.

The Mobile Archive has been shown at exhibitions, conferences, festivals and university classrooms, often accompanied by artist talks, curated screening programs, and discussions.

Hosts so far have included: Kunstverein Hamburg, Germany; WYSPA Institute of Art, Gdansk, Poland; Gallery Nova, Zagreb, Croatia; Universita luav di Venezia, Venice, Italy; Halle fur Kunst, Luneberg, Germany; The Newbury Gallery of The Glasgow School of Art, Glasgow, Scotland; Careof e Viafarini, DOCVA, Milan, Italy; Art in General, New York, USA; Stacion Center for Contemporary Art Prishtina, Prishtina, Kosovo; Centro da Cultura Judaica, Sao Paulo, Brazil; Kunsthaus Baselland / Dreispitz, Basel, Switzerland; VAC – UT Austin, Texas, USA; Tranzitdisplay, Prague, Czech Republic; steirischer herbst Festival, Graz, Austria and Leeds Metropolitan University, Leeds, UK.

The Mobile Archive is conceived of as a continually expanding resource and all the above-named institutions have contributed new video works to the archive as it tours.

Agnieszka Polska creates video works employing mainly found material, such as archive photography and illustrations, which she subjects to subtle interventions, whether animating them or working them into the existing image. In the process, the artist changes their primary context, simultaneously creating illusions of documentation. She investigates the impact of documentation on its future reception. Her visually powerful explorations of lost times or half-forgotten figures of the Polish avant-garde, turn to how the past is fictionalised and re-worked.

Anyone with a keen interest in Norse mythology, art and archaeology may find it well worth their time to visit Grötlingbo, a small village located towards the southern end of the island of Gotland, in the Baltic Sea. Behind the medieval stone church in the graveyard, among the scattered tombstones, there is one whose peculiar twisted form separates it from the others:  atop a cubic stone base stands an approximately 50-cm-tall bronze sculpture in the shape of a bust. The contorted portrait gives the impression of a lump of clay thrown to the ground. This marks the final resting place of internationally acclaimed Danish artist Asger Jorn (1914-1973). Jorn was well known both for his extensive oeuvre of abstract expressionist paintings and sculptures and for being the founding member of important post-war avant-garde movements such as the COBRA (1948-51) and the Situationist International.

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Asger Jorn’s grave in Grötlingbo, Gotland. Photo: Henrik Andersson.

This gives rise to the question: “Why does this famous artist have his final resting place in this particular place on Gotland?” Jorn had no family from the island, but, according to a local artist, the area was something of a spiritual home to him. Throughout his career, Jorn found inspiration in folk art, which he saw as an immediate expression of creativity. Following his break with the Situationist movement, he in 1962 founded , together with a scholarly group consisting of Peter Glob and Werner Jacobsen (National Museum of Denmark, Copenhagen) and Holger Arbman (University of Lund, Sweden), the Scandinavian Institute Of Comparative Vandalism (Skandinavisk institut for sammenlignende vandalisme – SISV), which was intended to operate both as a publishing house and as a research centre bringing together different disciplines ranging from archaeology, art and cultural history to the visual arts in order to revisit the legacy of pre-Christian Scandinavia, within the European context. Jorn was working towards what he called “10,000 years of Nordic Folk Art” (10 000 års nordisk folkekunst), a series of 32 books with photographs of historical artefacts based on his research and documentation. The content was to be assembled and edited together with the assistance of both scholars from academia and the publisher, Skandinavisk Forlag. Jorn worked with the design and layout of the extensive photographic material and as editor of the books. His artistic ambitions later proved to be a hindrance to the realization of the series (only one book was published in his lifetime), as the academics grew increasingly critical towards his approach and work methods, which led Jorn to terminate the project.

The archive of the Scandinavian Institute Of Comparative Vandalism is now housed in the Museum Jorn in Silkeborg, Denmark. Together with manuscripts, it consists of over 25,000 photographs (mostly negatives and contact sheets) taken by French photographer Gerard Franceschi and Ulrik Ross, who had been commissioned by Jorn to document historical artefacts during their trips through Scandinavia and Europe. Andersson’s research is aimed at inventorying the archives, while at the same time questioning the accumulated material, its history, and its past and current status and context, as well as the aesthetic and political implications of Jorn’s encyclopaedic comparative method – his work as an artist-historian operating in the field of scientific historical research, with the research itself as his artistic material. (text edited from the artist’s proposal)

“The structure of Future Days, the constant “stumbling” over the remains of works of art (which are, perhaps, not works of art at all, but rather their material after-effects), recalls a classic, pseudo-touristic text by Robert Smithson, A Tour of the Monuments of Passaic, New Jersey, which was first published in Artforum in 1967. The artists blundering through heaven are forever talking and thinking about art, the horizon of the new ultimately out of sight. Condemned to eternity, they can no longer dream of originality or “progress.” As Bas Jan Ader once suggested, they are “consumers of extreme comfort,” endlessly staring into the past. (…)”

Excerpt from Sebastian Cichocki, Agnieszka Polska, Future Days, or: The Artist as Sight-seer, in “Tourists Like Us-Critical Tourism and Contemporary Art” (eds.: Frederika Martini and Vytautas Michelkevičius), ECAV-Ecole Cantonale d`Art du Valais, Sierre and Vilnius Academy of Arts Press in association with VAA Nida Art Colony, 2013. Read more

In 2012 Goshka Macuga visited Afghanistan twice to research her project for dOCUMENTA(13) opening that same year. During her stay she visited the Afghan Film Archive in Kabul and learned about their precarious and endangered operation during the Taliban era. The threats to the archive are due to a constant lack of resources needed to digitize stocks of newsreels, feature and documentary films, and funding to maintain equipment and the premises. Macuga became interested in supporting the archive and decided to buy small strips of film that have been thrown away through the process of digitization. Following extensive email correspondence with an Afghan mediator, she was sent a parcel of 35mm cut-offs. Surprisingly, the material turned out to be 19 separate film rolls containing only censored, sexually explicit scenes from foreign and Afghan films.

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For her newly commissioned works presented at Index in co-production with BAC, the artist proposed to re-edit and re-contextualize these censored footages. In re-ordering the material Macuga presents a new comparative reading to the differing perception, norms, conditioning to and permitted exposure of physical intimacy, violence and gender discrimination in Afghan and Western cultures. The display defines a dialogue with the archival material that in Non-Consensual Act (in progress) takes the form of a film, prints and documents. Included in the exhibition are excerpts of correspondence uncovering the obstacles, contradictions and opportunities that arose in approaching the material under scrutiny.

This is not the first time Macuga has worked with materials that have been removed from their source. Her series Untitled (2008) used photographs belonging to a Vietnam War veteran as part of the installation I Become Death, as well as the documentary film Snake Society in collaboration with the anthropologist Julian Gastelo, both shown at Kunsthalle Basel in 2009. In these works she selected images that resonated with her ongoing research on Aby Warburg’s study of the rituals and iconography of Hopi American Indian art.

PERPETUUM LABS part 1- Curating the Political is a 3-day event for professional debate and criticism, and constructive and dissenting opinions on primarily exhibition practices in the field. The LAB will use prominent case-studies in curatorial practice as starting points, while drawing on theoretical texts, academic research and activist practice. Each LAB will also develop new approaches and potentials for future projects.

Bringing together established curators and artists by invitation, and a younger generation Nordic and Baltic resident participants by open call, the seminar seeks to develop analytical and nuanced positions starting from diverse set of well-informed standpoints.

PERPETUUM LABS / BAC proposes a number of questions to be discussed regarding the contemporary “political” artistic and curatorial strategies, their pitfalls (e.g. appropriation by the institutions being critiqued) and successes. Questions regarding how the notions of critical art, radical art, subversive art, provocative art, political art, and activist art operate within the current terminology will be raised, in regards to how curators approach, present, and reflect on acute political and social conflicts in the intersection of politics and art.

Based both on both recent projects of the invited international experts, and a selection of recent exhibitions, biennials and projects, the seminar discusses how politics, art and political action are and can be related. The question of whether the demand for “autonomy” is only a tactical/strategic position, or presents truly a philosophical stand, will be looked at. Finally the LAB will consider what role contemporary art plays in examining, articulating and presenting the current political state of affairs using the medium of exhibition.

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Mentors include Bassam el Baroni, curator and writer (Alexandria/London), Nicoline van Harskamp, artist (Amsterdam), Vladan Jeremic,curator, writer and activist (Belgrade), Marita Muukkonen, curator (Helsinki/Berlin), Livia Paldi, curator (Visby) and Ivor Stodolsky, curator and theorist  (Helsinki/Berlin).

Perpetuum Mobilε, co-founded by Ivor Stodolsky and Marita Muukkonen in 2007, is a curatorial vehicle which brings together art, practice and enquiry and develops longer-term thematic projects including conferences, workshops, residencies and small and large exhibitions. PM has worked extensively at the Nordic region, European and international level. Their projects include The Perpetual Gypsy Pavilion (launched during the 53rd Venice Biennale in 2009), The Arts Assembly, an art-and-debate format which has been deployed at ACSI in Helsinki, the 8th Manifesta Biennale, ENSBA in Paris and CAFA in Beijing. Their most recent thematic project is A Re-Aligned Art.

Bauer and Thor will discuss their conceptual backgrounds and working methods with archives and documents and the role of the image in bearing witness to historical events. Their talk will be supported by a selection of films from The Mobile Archive currently hosted by BAC. Read more about the archive.

The film develops a narrative of a fictitious society on an unstable piece of land in danger of disappearing. This situation requires the population’s collective initiative in order to secure the survival of the individual and of the society. The concept has a certain basis in reality since Gotska Sandön moves approximately one meter per year. Fictional expert reports strengthen the surrealistic atmosphere that slowly but surely replaces the experience of what one might first consider a beautiful documentary with a more abstract and somewhat absurd picture of people’s struggle and vulnerability.

Outwardly from Earth’s Center was produced on Gotland in the framework of BAC’s Production-in-Residence program in 2006.

You are a dancer is a radio-play created by Annie Vigier and Franck Apertet (les gens d’Uterpan). It is made up of six sessions that specifically interpret six radio formats (jingle, hit single, report, lesson, reportage, documentary). The content of the sessions exploits the language associated with a choreographer’s work, their protocols of airplay are a response to the standardisation of radio’s mediums of information.

“Using radio we transpose the work and action of the choreographer, by applying his or her injunctions, orders and incitements to the listening audience. The displacement of the choreographer’s authority via the radio involves using the qualities, restrictions and formatting of radio itself. Our strategy thus relies on using the specificity of radio and the choreographer’s authoritative influence on the body in order to make one feel the systems, conditioning and formatting that weigh upon the individual in contemporary society.”

“Our strategy re-visits radio as a source of connection to the world, a vector of knowledge and a democratic medium.
Because it reaches people in their intimate sphere, radio allows us to act without discrimination upon free, anonymous individuals – unlisted and unsolicited – citizens, in the true sense of the term. For us, radio proposes a fundamental way of increasing the social space of performance and the relationships of an individual with other individuals.
You are a dancer proposes a unique relationship among the heads and programmers of radio, the commissioners of the radio-play, artists and the listening audience.”

Within the framework of the residency at the CAC Brétigny (since 2009), the choreographers Annie Vigier and Franck Apertet (les gens d’Uterpan) propose with Pierre Bal-Blanc (director of CAC Brétigny) and Philippe Vannini (president of Aligre FM 93.1), and extension of the exhibition space through the use of radio, lasting one entire year.

Freies Radio Innsbruck FREIRAD, June 6 – Dec 9, 2016.
On invitation by Andrei Siclodi (artistic director Künstlerhaus Büchsenhausen, Innsbruck, Austria) the choreographers Annie Vigier and Franck Apertet (les gens d’Uterpan) propose an extension of the Künstlerhaus’ exhibition space through the use of radio. During six months four sessions will infiltrate the regular program of Freies Radio Innsbruck FREIRAD. The News are recorded in German especially for this occasion. The audience can follow it on MHz in the region around Innsbruck as well as online.

Formats:
> Jingle: You are a fucking dancer, 4″
> Lesson: 360°, 6′ 15″
> Report: What’s new, 3′ 31″
> Reportage: Let’s get oriented, 8′ 17″
> Documentary: Notation, 29′ 42″
> Hit: Radio skills arouse the idiot tsar, 3′ 35″

Each session aims:
– to be interpreted by the listener, consciously or unconsciously in the context in which he or she finds himself.
– to incite the listener to consider his or her implication in, and relation to society.
– to make the listener consciously react to the systems of authority that structure his or her environment.

Conception: Annie Vigier and Franck Apertet (les gens d’Uterpan)
Recordings and sound design: Nicolas Martz
Texts: Franck Apertet and Annier Vigier
Translations: Dominic Gould
Voices: Franck Apertet, Dominic Gould, Annier Vigier
Contributions: Laurent Seigneur, Davide Napoli
Consultant: Hassane M’Béchour
French translations and recordings: CAC Brétigny

 

Travelling South is a visual essay composed of stills, found and restaged photographs, and footage taken on the English coast, Elafiti (Croatia) and Gotland (Sweden). Exact geographical locations are not revealed, but are alluded to. There is an actor/protagonist in the film (one character, but represented in two ways: a black and white photograph, and footage of an actor), who has no specific role other than that of a conceptual character who wanders through the space of the film, and across times, sometimes acting as the connecting component between shots, as an underlying constant, in sound terms a repetitive baseline or a chorus.

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Photo: Tina Gverović, 2012

Although related directly to the locations, the sound is not descriptive of the visual element and it is produced separately from the film. The sound generally creates the sense of an internal space (or weaving between private, interior, cerebral, bodily space and the outside world of things and people, concrete sounds, concrete realities…), relating to daydreaming, but not ‘dreamy’. There are some slightly ‘psychedelic’ elements to film, in which ‘real’ or figurative images turn abstract, and vice versa.

Film/footage deals with themes of belonging and memory, displacement and imagination. It presents the idea of journeying and travelling south, and attempts to present a method of finding out, of investigation and discovery rather than representation.

The key questions are related to the impossibility of establishing identity on ‘solid grounds’, the lack of which encourages us to relate to various communities which can allow us a certain kind of temporary identity; or which on the other hand allows us to wander in standardized spaces produced by contemporary industries of the imaginary. Can we free ourselves from our heritage arriving at the place where we no longer depend on culturally specific categories/groups that we are born in, with a style of life that through our upbringing is moored in us?

Tina Gverović
Zaton, Dubrovnik, July 12, 2012

The Paths Crossing Production Residencies hosted twenty young and emerging visual artists and art professionals from new and applicant EU Member States. Coordinated by HIAP – Helsinki International Artist Programme (FI), the project included the participation of BAC–Baltic Art Center, Visby (SE), Fabrikken for Kunst og Design, Copenhagen (DK), Temple Bar Gallery + Studios, Dublin (IE) and Nordisk Kunstnarsenter Dalsåsen (NO).

The central purpose of this collective endeavor was to discover and support new talent, providing international mobility to visual artists and art professionals from Eastern and Central Europe, and to develop new networks of cooperation with the participating countries. Together the five artist-in-residency centers were able to provide for twenty individual production and research residencies, each from one to six months in duration.

At BAC curator Maija Rudowska worked on the research for her exhibition and publication project, Inside and Out (with Zane Onckule), 2012, Contemporary Art Centre, Riga, Latvia.

Tina Gverović, came to BAC to work on her video project Travelling South, a visual essay composed of stills, found and restaged photographs, and footage, taken on the English coast, Elafiti (Croatia) and Gotland (Sweden).
Read more about Travelling South.

© Maija Rudowska, "Inside and Out", 2012